Alex Lowery speaks about autism

Autism and social media

Written on 10th Dec 2015 by Alex Lowery

This December Ambitious about autism has created a digital advent Calendar. They will post about a different person with a connection to autism each day for 25 days. You can view the calendar here. I wrote a blog for them about autism and Social Media, which was Published on the 8th of December. I’ve cut down some of the original introduction for the blog. Feel free to read it below. 

My name is Alex Lowery and I was diagnosed with autism at the age of 4. I am now 22 years old and am a Youth Patron for Ambitious about Autism. I provide talks and awareness training on the subject of autism.

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I also use a lot of social media. I have a Facebook page, a YouTube Channel and I also use Twitter.

One rather significant trait of my autism is that I struggle to socialize and talk to people. I don’t have many friends. I don’t tend to mix all that much at all. When I’m in church, after the service, I tend to spend most of my time walking around in circles when everyone else is chatting. I will leave the house to give a speech or when it’s part of my routine (I do have weekly routine of leaving the house). Outside of that, (with a some exceptions) I spend most of my time in doors. I find socialising much easier over the Internet than I do face-to-face. I feel as though social media can be a good tool to help people with autism to socialize.

When I was in my mid-teens (around 15-17) I made a lot of YouTube videos about autism, and I posted video responses to other young people with autism. I often posted comments on videos by other autistic people and vice-versa. We’d also comment on each other’s channels.

I started to feel like there was a group of people I belonged to. I even felt like I had actually made friends through YouTube.

Now don’t get me wrong, you have got to be extremely careful on social media, especially if you’re under age. I have seen young people with autism do extremely foolish things on the Internet such as putting their MSN address public on YouTube for everyone to see, and you can probably see at once why this is such a foolish idea. However, when social media is used in the correct way I feel like it can be an excellent tool for people with autism of all ages.

I also joined a forum on the Internet called ‘The Wrong Planet’. It’s a forum for people with autism to discuss things. When there was something about autism I was unsure about or wanted to know if others felt the same way as me about a certain thing, I’d ask in the forum. I found the Wrong Planet to be very helpful. It helped me to understand autism better and feel less alone. I still use this forum now sometimes.

I do a lot of blogging about autism now, and I used to blog a lot through my teens too, but it wasn’t about autism. I owned a blog where I liked to share my every-day thoughts. Some of my friends also had blogs and we’d comment on each other’s blogs. This as another way in which the Internet helped me to interact with people.

As well as helping me to have friends and talk to people, the Internet helped my English writing improve. For years, I really struggled to write anything that made sense. I couldn’t spell to save my life, and my punctuation was awful. However, I started reading other people’s comments on my YouTube videos and blog, and gradually began to pick up basic grammar, and learn to use it better. Now, it wasn’t entirely social media that improved my English. I also did a few brain-training programs, and I also attended a key-skills English course, but social media did help. If you want to see an example of how bad my grammar was, just look at this blog I posted in 2008.

My spelling and punctuation at that time was appalling. I have no idea how I managed to think it was good enough for the world of the Internet to see. I’ve certainly come on a lot since then.

If any of you reading this have relatives with autism or have autism yourself, allow me to tell you that the Internet can be a great tool for individuals with autism. If you or anyone you know is struggling to make friends then the Internet can be a great way forward.

If you want to know more about how the Internet helped me as person with autism feel free to check out my book. I have written an autobiography. It’s about my experiences of growing up with autism. It goes through my earliest memories at the age of 3 (when I found the world to be a terrifying place), to learning that I have autism, to learning to accept and embrace my autism, all way up to going into business as a public speaker on autism. You will learn that the Internet was partially responsible for helping me to accept autism as a part of who I am. I hope my book can help parents of people with autism as well as autistic people themselves. I also hope to help people in general, just to raise awareness of autism spectrum conditions. The book is called ‘Thinking Club: A filmstrip of my life as a person with autism’.

This article was originally written for Ambitious about autism’s “25 days of autism” Calendar. You can view the original article here.

#‎25daysofautism

heck out my book. I have written an autobiography. It’s about my experiences of growing up with autism. It goes through my earliest memories at the age of 3 (when I found the world to be a terrifying place), to learning that I have autism, to learning t – See more at: https://www.ambitiousaboutautism.org.uk/understanding-autism/day-8-alex-lowery-talks-about-autism-and-social-media#sthash.milq4zAb.dpuf

My name is Alex Lowery and I was diagnosed with autism at the age of 4. I am now 22 years old and am a Youth Patron for Ambitious about Autism.

With support from my family, I run my own business in raising awareness of autism. I provide talks and awareness training on the subject of autism spectrum conditions.

I also have a website with a blog. I regularly blog on a number of different angles of autism. My Mother also blogs about raising a child with autism and I will sometimes ask a fellow autistic person or parent or professional to write an article for my blog. I’ve even asked some fellow Youth Patrons to write articles.

I also use a lot of social media. I have a Facebook page, a YouTube Channel and I also use Twitter.

One rather significant trait of my autism is that I struggle to socialize and talk to people. I don’t have many friends. I don’t tend to mix all that much at all. When I’m in church, after the service, I tend to spend most of my time walking around in circles when everyone else is chatting. I will leave the house to give a speech or when it’s part of my routine (I do have weekly routine of leaving the house). Outside of that, (with a some exceptions) I spend a lot of my time in doors. I find socializing much easier over the Internet than I do face-to-face. I feel as though social media can be a good tool to help people with autism to socialize.

When I was in my mid-teens (around 15-17) I made a lot of YouTube videos about autism, and I posted video responses to other young people with autism. I often posted comments on videos by other autistic people and vice-versa. We’d also comment on each others channels.

I started to feel like there was a group of people I belonged to. I even felt like I had actually made friends through YouTube.

Now don’t get me wrong, you have got to be extremely careful on social media, especially if you’re under age. I have seen young people with autism do extremely foolish things on the Internet such as putting their MSN address public on YouTube for everyone to see, and you can probably see at once why this is such a foolish idea. However, when social media is used in the correct way I feel like it can be an excellent tool for people with autism of all ages.

I also joined a forum on the internet called ‘The Wrong Planet’. It’s a forum for people with autism to discuss things. When there was something about autism I was unsure about or wanted to know if others felt the same way as me about a certain thing, I’d ask in the forum. I found the Wrong Planet to be very helpful. It helped me to understand autism better and feel less alone. I still use this forum now sometimes.

I mentioned earlier that I blog about autism. I used to blog a lot through my teens too, but it wasn’t about autism. I owned a blog where I liked to share my every-day thoughts. Some of my friends also had blogs and we’d comment on each others blogs. This as another way in which the Internet helped me to interact with people.

As well as helping me to have friends and talk to people, the Internet helped my English writing improve. For years, I really struggled to write anything that made sense. I couldn’t spell to save my life, and my punctuation was awful. However, I started reading other people’s comments on my YouTube videos and blog, and gradually began to pick up basic grammar, and learn to use it better. Now, it wasn’t entirely social media that improved my English. I also did a few brain training programs, and I also attended a key-skills English course, but social media did help. If you want to see an example of how bad my grammar was, just look at this blog I posted in 2008.

My spelling and punctuation at that time was appalling. I have no idea how I managed to think it was good enough for the world of the Internet to see. I’ve certainly come on a lot since then.

If any of you reading this have relatives with autism or have autism yourself, allow me to tell you that the Internet can be a great tool for individuals with autism. If you or anyone you know is struggling to make friends then the Internet can be a great way forward.

If you want to know more about how the Internet helped me as person with autism feel free to check out my book. I have written an autobiography. It’s about my experiences of growing up with autism. It goes through my earliest memories at the age of 3 (when I found the world to be a terrifying place), to learning that I have autism, to learning to accept and embrace my autism, all way up to going into business as a public speaker on autism. You will learn that the Internet was partially responsible for helping me to accept autism as a part of who I am. I hope my book can help parents of people with autism as well as autistic people themselves. I also hope to help people in general, just to raise awareness of autism spectrtions. The book is called ‘Thinking Club: A filmstrip of my life as a person with autism’.

– See more at: https://www.ambitiousaboutautism.org.uk/understanding-autism/day-8-alex-lowery-talks-about-autism-and-social-media#sthash.milq4zAb.dpuf

My name is Alex Lowery and I was diagnosed with autism at the age of 4. I am now 22 years old and am a Youth Patron for Ambitious about Autism.

With support from my family, I run my own business in raising awareness of autism. I provide talks and awareness training on the subject of autism spectrum conditions.

I also have a website with a blog. I regularly blog on a number of different angles of autism. My Mother also blogs about raising a child with autism and I will sometimes ask a fellow autistic person or parent or professional to write an article for my blog. I’ve even asked some fellow Youth Patrons to write articles.

I also use a lot of social media. I have a Facebook page, a YouTube Channel and I also use Twitter.

One rather significant trait of my autism is that I struggle to socialize and talk to people. I don’t have many friends. I don’t tend to mix all that much at all. When I’m in church, after the service, I tend to spend most of my time walking around in circles when everyone else is chatting. I will leave the house to give a speech or when it’s part of my routine (I do have weekly routine of leaving the house). Outside of that, (with a some exceptions) I spend a lot of my time in doors. I find socializing much easier over the Internet than I do face-to-face. I feel as though social media can be a good tool to help people with autism to socialize.

When I was in my mid-teens (around 15-17) I made a lot of YouTube videos about autism, and I posted video responses to other young people with autism. I often posted comments on videos by other autistic people and vice-versa. We’d also comment on each others channels.

I started to feel like there was a group of people I belonged to. I even felt like I had actually made friends through YouTube.

Now don’t get me wrong, you have got to be extremely careful on social media, especially if you’re under age. I have seen young people with autism do extremely foolish things on the Internet such as putting their MSN address public on YouTube for everyone to see, and you can probably see at once why this is such a foolish idea. However, when social media is used in the correct way I feel like it can be an excellent tool for people with autism of all ages.

I also joined a forum on the internet called ‘The Wrong Planet’. It’s a forum for people with autism to discuss things. When there was something about autism I was unsure about or wanted to know if others felt the same way as me about a certain thing, I’d ask in the forum. I found the Wrong Planet to be very helpful. It helped me to understand autism better and feel less alone. I still use this forum now sometimes.

I mentioned earlier that I blog about autism. I used to blog a lot through my teens too, but it wasn’t about autism. I owned a blog where I liked to share my every-day thoughts. Some of my friends also had blogs and we’d comment on each others blogs. This as another way in which the Internet helped me to interact with people.

As well as helping me to have friends and talk to people, the Internet helped my English writing improve. For years, I really struggled to write anything that made sense. I couldn’t spell to save my life, and my punctuation was awful. However, I started reading other people’s comments on my YouTube videos and blog, and gradually began to pick up basic grammar, and learn to use it better. Now, it wasn’t entirely social media that improved my English. I also did a few brain training programs, and I also attended a key-skills English course, but social media did help. If you want to see an example of how bad my grammar was, just look at this blog I posted in 2008.

My spelling and punctuation at that time was appalling. I have no idea how I managed to think it was good enough for the world of the Internet to see. I’ve certainly come on a lot since then.

If any of you reading this have relatives with autism or have autism yourself, allow me to tell you that the Internet can be a great tool for individuals with autism. If you or anyone you know is struggling to make friends then the Internet can be a great way forward.

If you want to know more about how the Internet helped me as person with autism feel free to check out my book. I have written an autobiography. It’s about my experiences of growing up with autism. It goes through my earliest memories at the age of 3 (when I found the world to be a terrifying place), to learning that I have autism, to learning to accept and embrace my autism, all way up to going into business as a public speaker on autism. You will learn that the Internet was partially responsible for helping me to accept autism as a part of who I am. I hope my book can help parents of people with autism as well as autistic people themselves. I also hope to help people in general, just to raise awareness of autism spectrtions. The book is called ‘Thinking Club: A filmstrip of my life as a person with autism’.

– See more at: https://www.ambitiousaboutautism.org.uk/understanding-autism/day-8-alex-lowery-talks-about-autism-and-social-media#sthash.milq4zAb.dpuf

My name is Alex Lowery and I was diagnosed with autism at the age of 4. I am now 22 years old and am a Youth Patron for Ambitious about Autism.

With support from my family, I run my own business in raising awareness of autism. I provide talks and awareness training on the subject of autism spectrum conditions.

I also have a website with a blog. I regularly blog on a number of different angles of autism. My Mother also blogs about raising a child with autism and I will sometimes ask a fellow autistic person or parent or professional to write an article for my blog. I’ve even asked some fellow Youth Patrons to write articles.

I also use a lot of social media. I have a Facebook page, a YouTube Channel and I also use Twitter.

One rather significant trait of my autism is that I struggle to socialize and talk to people. I don’t have many friends. I don’t tend to mix all that much at all. When I’m in church, after the service, I tend to spend most of my time walking around in circles when everyone else is chatting. I will leave the house to give a speech or when it’s part of my routine (I do have weekly routine of leaving the house). Outside of that, (with a some exceptions) I spend a lot of my time in doors. I find socializing much easier over the Internet than I do face-to-face. I feel as though social media can be a good tool to help people with autism to socialize.

When I was in my mid-teens (around 15-17) I made a lot of YouTube videos about autism, and I posted video responses to other young people with autism. I often posted comments on videos by other autistic people and vice-versa. We’d also comment on each others channels.

I started to feel like there was a group of people I belonged to. I even felt like I had actually made friends through YouTube.

Now don’t get me wrong, you have got to be extremely careful on social media, especially if you’re under age. I have seen young people with autism do extremely foolish things on the Internet such as putting their MSN address public on YouTube for everyone to see, and you can probably see at once why this is such a foolish idea. However, when social media is used in the correct way I feel like it can be an excellent tool for people with autism of all ages.

I also joined a forum on the internet called ‘The Wrong Planet’. It’s a forum for people with autism to discuss things. When there was something about autism I was unsure about or wanted to know if others felt the same way as me about a certain thing, I’d ask in the forum. I found the Wrong Planet to be very helpful. It helped me to understand autism better and feel less alone. I still use this forum now sometimes.

I mentioned earlier that I blog about autism. I used to blog a lot through my teens too, but it wasn’t about autism. I owned a blog where I liked to share my every-day thoughts. Some of my friends also had blogs and we’d comment on each others blogs. This as another way in which the Internet helped me to interact with people.

As well as helping me to have friends and talk to people, the Internet helped my English writing improve. For years, I really struggled to write anything that made sense. I couldn’t spell to save my life, and my punctuation was awful. However, I started reading other people’s comments on my YouTube videos and blog, and gradually began to pick up basic grammar, and learn to use it better. Now, it wasn’t entirely social media that improved my English. I also did a few brain training programs, and I also attended a key-skills English course, but social media did help. If you want to see an example of how bad my grammar was, just look at this blog I posted in 2008.

My spelling and punctuation at that time was appalling. I have no idea how I managed to think it was good enough for the world of the Internet to see. I’ve certainly come on a lot since then.

If any of you reading this have relatives with autism or have autism yourself, allow me to tell you that the Internet can be a great tool for individuals with autism. If you or anyone you know is struggling to make friends then the Internet can be a great way forward.

If you want to know more about how the Internet helped me as person with autism feel free to check out my book. I have written an autobiography. It’s about my experiences of growing up with autism. It goes through my earliest memories at the age of 3 (when I found the world to be a terrifying place), to learning that I have autism, to learning to accept and embrace my autism, all way up to going into business as a public speaker on autism. You will learn that the Internet was partially responsible for helping me to accept autism as a part of who I am. I hope my book can help parents of people with autism as well as autistic people themselves. I also hope to help people in general, just to raise awareness of autism spectrtions. The book is called ‘Thinking Club: A filmstrip of my life as a person with autism’.

– See more at: https://www.ambitiousaboutautism.org.uk/understanding-autism/day-8-alex-lowery-talks-about-autism-and-social-media#sthash.milq4zAb.dpuf

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Organisations Alex has worked with

  • Autism Cymru
  • Chester University
  • Glyndwr University
  • National Autistic Society
  • St John's Ambulance
  • Welsh Government

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